Gruntled

This is Sookie’s “Resting gruntled face,”

I realize that it looks like she slept on her whiskers and half of her face wrong, but she is very gruntled. She is spending more time chilling out beside me in the evenings, allowing me to pet her without panicking, and, horror of horrors, sometimes actively sitting on or leaning against my legs. Even though the last “sitting on” ended with biting -her not me- and dramatic flip off the couch, it’s progress.

I jokingly called this her gruntled face which put me a little closer to the word origin than I thought. Merriam-Webster informed me that a writer humorously turned “disgruntled” into its happy opposite “gruntled” in the 1920s and it caught on. The Oxford dictionary says 1930s, but so far I can’t determine who the writer was. It’s goofy, gruntled stories like this that helps remind me that language can be fun.

Even Michael Scott of The Office gets it in a speaker phone conversation with Jan: “It was a crime of passion, Jan. Not a disgruntled employee. Everyone here is extremely gruntled.”

Totally gruntled.